Kaspar Villiger

Kaspar Villiger

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Kaspar Villiger

Member of the Swiss Federal Council

In office
1 February 1989 – 31 December 2003

Preceded by
Elisabeth Kopp

Succeeded by
Hans-Rudolf Merz

President of Switzerland

In office
1 January 1995 – 31 December 1995

Vice President
Jean-Pascal Delamuraz

Preceded by
Otto Stich

Succeeded by
Jean-Pascal Delamuraz

In office
1 January 2002 – 31 December 2002

Vice President
Pascal Couchepin

Preceded by
Moritz Leuenberger

Succeeded by
Pascal Couchepin

Minister of the Military

In office
1 February 1989 – 31 December 1995

Preceded by
Arnold Koller

Succeeded by
Adolf Ogi

Minister of Finance

In office
1 January 1996 – 31 December 2003

Preceded by
Otto Stich

Succeeded by
Hans-Rudolf Merz

Vice President of Switzerland

In office
1 January 2001 – 31 December 2001

President
Moritz Leuenberger

Preceded by
Moritz Leuenberger

Succeeded by
Pascal Couchepin

Personal details

Born
(1941-02-05) 5 February 1941 (age 75)
Pfeffikon, Lucerne

Political party
Free Democratic Party

Children
2

Alma mater
ETH Zurich

Profession
Mechanical engineer

Kaspar Villiger (pronounced Caspar Feeleeger) (born 5 February 1941) is a Swiss businessman, politician and former member of the Swiss Federal Council (1989–2003).

Contents

1 Political career
2 Business career
3 Other activities
4 References
5 External links

Political career[edit]
On February 1, 1989, he was elected to the Swiss Federal Council. He is affiliated to the Free Democratic Party (Liberals).
During his time in office he headed the following departments:

Federal Military Department (1989 – 1995)
Federal Department of Finance (1996 – 2003)

He was President of the Confederation twice, in 1995 and again in 2002.
In 1995 Kaspar Villiger apologized on occasion of an official visit by Dan Culler who was an internee in the Wauwilermoos internment camp during World War II. Dwight Mears, a U.S. Army officer, covered the apology in his 2012 PhD thesis on the American internees in Switzerland.[1][2][3][4]
In September 2003, he announced he was to resign on 31 Decem

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